When Talk is Not Cheap, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

We have all heard the expression that “talk is cheap.” Here’s an instance when it’s not: whenever 2 or more competitors get together to discuss the terms of business. In that situation, the potential to cross over into prohibited topics could put all companies at risk. That is one of the main reasons that you have chosen to protect your company by joining an industry credit group facilitated by a representative from CMA.

Your CMA representative monitors all group discussions to ensure compliance with the three statements read at the beginning of each meeting, Anti-Trust, Confidentiality and Anti-Defamation. CMA Group Facilitators have all been trained, certified and are responsible during the meetings (and extending to those conversations in the parking lot) to assure that all members adhere to the guidelines set forth by the government. We listen for any suggestions to restrict free trade or for any attempt to try influencing another’s decision to sell or not to sell an account. If the conversation drifts in that direction, your CMA rep will shut it down.

Sharing historical, factual data on common customers is perfectly legal. We encourage group members to bring new credit applications, slow paying customers and accounts sent to legal to the meeting to alert other members, who will in turn share similar information about their customers with you. The trust built up between competitors allows them to participate honestly and share information in good faith as long as only historical and factual trade experiences are exchanged.

So the next time your attempt at humor is shot down by your group facilitator, think if the punchline falls into one of the 3 statements read prior to every meeting. If it does, he or she has steered your company away from litigation with fees far exceeding the cost of membership for years to come.

We, at CMA, know that your time is valuable, that you are probably wearing more hats then in previous years with a reduced staff. Wasting time is not an option. Our job is to provide a comfortable environment free of distractions for you to gain knowledge, network and to get you back to the office so you can process what you learned quickly, and in turn make quicker, educated credit decisions.

Without a governing body like CMA overseeing your monthly get together, talk could be very expensive.

What is the Information in the Group Reports Not Telling Me?, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

Having just completed a very informative Industry Credit Group call, I thought for a minute of the companies that did not participate on the call. Most of them contributed accounts to the monthly Past Due Report, many with considerable dollars in the 90-day past due column. That satisfied one part of their group responsibilities, yet by not attending, they lost out on valuable trade info about the accounts they had reported.

Had they been on the call or at the meeting, they would have heard two industry leaders give vital information on accounts they listed. They reported that they no longer sell to that account because of extreme slow pay, information not on the report but of great value. Had they been on the call or present at the meeting, they would have also heard about a major problem affecting payments on a large construction project that many suppliers are involved in or sell to a company who is. Again, this information was not on the report but of extreme importance. In fact, because the people on the call were major players in the industry, they knew something about most of the non-attendees reported accounts.

Numbers on a report do not always tell the entire story. Were you aware that there is a new A/P person at ABC Electric or that a Home Deport opened across from Acme Hardware causing a 60% drop in business? Did you know that a mutual customer is only cutting checks once a month or that Smith Food got hit with a large Tax lien? Information like this is routinely exchanged on these calls/meetings.

Only by attending the meeting/call can you be sure that you are getting the complete picture on the financial stability of your customers. The information is there for the taking. Insist on it by making it a priority to be at every group event and asking questions.

The answers might just save your company $$$ and you major headaches.

CMA Industry Credit Groups, Your Best Search Engine, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

My kids find it hard to believe that when I was in school, the place you went to find answers to your homework or to gather information for a paper was the Encyclopedia Britannica. This was several thick books with information on anything you needed, although the accuracy depended on what edition you had. My edition claimed the US had only 48 states.

The current generation has it much easier since Google came along, just enter, click and multiple results appeared with everything you needed.

Your membership in CMA and an Industry Credit Group makes it just as easy. Have a question on Chapter 11 BK; call Molly Froschauer in the Adjustment Bureau. Need an effective Demand Letter, go to the Encyclopedia of Credit. If it is the most current trade information on a customer, draw an anscers report or enter an RFI. Looking for accounts receivable software that is credit friendly, poll your group. Need to further your credit education, CMA has that covered.

If you utilize CMA and the Industry Credit Group as your primary search engine for all credit related issues, the results will reduce your time and expenses.

It will not be necessary to pay your corporate attorney an hourly fee for researching Bankruptcy questions that CMA can answer for free. Whose recommendation means more, salesmen trying to sell you a $100K computer system or someone in your group performing the same job as you using the system? Need to file Lien, get a D&B, place an account for collection, take a financial statement class, start your search with CMA.

You have the support of a Business Association that has been around for over 130 years. Behind each tab on the anscers home page are people waiting to assist you.

Whether you have been in credit for 30 years or 30 days, there are laws and procedures that are changing daily. CMA membership guarantees you the most current edition.

Why Are There No Pictures of Credit Managers, by Larry Convoy

As I travel around making visits at member companies, I am constantly amazed how many of the lobbies are shrines to the Salesperson of the Month or Regional or District Team of the Quarter, or some like group. Being in sales, I know how difficult it is to achieve and maintain some of these goals, so I certainly do not harbor any ill feelings for this recognition.

My question is, where are the pictures and accolades for those who open, investigate, monitor and routinely babysit the account so that the customer continues reordering and the sales team earns their plaques on the wall? Is management aware of the contribution you are making to this effort?

Do they know that information from CMA’s Group alerts prompted you to put the account on COD months before the BK, thus saving the company major dollars? Are they aware that knowledge picked up at a CMA Lien webinar or protection you gained by placing a lien through CMA’s lien services department showed you how to protect your rights and receive payment when others did not? Do they know that by analyzing credit reports, you were able to raise the credit limit and therefore assist the sales team in making their numbers?

It is not a violation of group confidentiality to inform senior management that their investment in CMA and the group has resulted in major savings or increased revenue. By informing them routinely how THEIR decision has benefitted the organization, you will have an easier sell at renewal time or when you wish to attend an educational event or possibly at your annual review. If you are not going to tell them, who will?

I look forward to seeing your picture prominently displayed as a valued member of the team.

Why it’s Important to Participate in CMA (and How You Should Participate), by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

If your Industry Credit Group is anything like some of our other groups, your participation has never been more vital to your company.

We are seeing the super stores (Costco, Home Depot, Walmart, etc.) taking a very substantial market share from the small- to medium-sized businesses. Amazon and other internet-based sites are making it easy for anyone to order any product regardless of where they are located. The days of neighborhood stores and reliable customer service are being replaced by free shipping and easy return policies.

The best way to stay ahead of this trend to protect your company is by participating daily in your industry credit group.

By posting alerts, you not only send out a warning, but it might trigger another member to look at their aging and see the same customer slowing and now a pattern develops. This is exactly the scenario that saved members of the Underwater Sports group from large losses when two major sporting goods companies filed BK in 2016. Post your alert at the first sign of slowness.

By requesting and responding to RFIs, you get a complete picture of the customer you are dealing with. Can the customer handle the total outstanding balance on the report? How is he paying his other suppliers?

The third advantage you have is the monthly meeting/ conference call. There is no other profession where companies share trade and Best Practices with their competitors for their mutual well-being. The meeting is about 90 minutes including lunch, the calls are usually half that time. There is no task that can be performed in that time span that could have a greater financial effect on your company.

There are some extraordinary people in CMA’s groups that know that if they pick up one piece of information at a meeting, on the call or through an alert/RFI, it is time well spent.

The date or call in number is located on your group home page on www.anscers.com. Plan on participating at your next meeting and throughout the year.

How Did the Underwater Sports Credit Group Get Started, Keep its Original Objectives and Continue to Thrive?, by Larry Convoy

How does an industry credit group get started, keep its original objectives and thrive? Take the case of 55-year-old CMA Group Underwater Sports.

On July 12, 1961, representatives from Healthways, US Divers, Voit, Swimmaster and Sportsways held the first official meeting of the newly formed Underwater Sports Equipment Credit Group facilitated by Credit Management Association. These pioneers knew that in order for this industry to grow, manufacturers and retailers must establish guidelines for extending credit, investigating and monitoring new and existing accounts and have a governing body to oversee that all state and Federal laws regarding free trade were adhered to.

Fifty five years later, this group is still instrumental in the industry utilizing the most current technology to insure that the original mission statement, which emphasized “looking for the latest methods to expand the business and the sport of diving,” is applied to each transaction.

Over the last twenty to thirty years, we have seen a dramatic change in the industry. The ownership of retail diving stores has transitioned from the businessman to the hobbyist. Manufacturers have expanded their product lines to encompass other sports and seasons and the group has gone from manual and paper reporting to entirely electronic. Information that took days to distribute now is instantaneous through the click of a mouse.

What has not changed is the value of the group to all in the industry. For the manufactures, having an immediate resource to verify a retailers credit worthiness, to the “Good Paying Account,” an opportunity to have more product lines available through positive payment experiences and to the “slow paying account,” the ability to deal with their suppliers to work out any problems or issues in order to maintain the flow of product needed to sustain the business, are all reasons the members keep coming back.

The diving industry suffered a major hit losing two of this nation’s most respected sporting goods retailers in 2016. Through the exchange of information, the members of the Underwater Sports group were able to identify certain trends and reduce their exposure considerably. A look at the list of the 20 largest creditors reveals that many Non-Diving manufacturers were not as fortunate.

As we conclude another diving season, we invite those manufacturers not participating in the group to investigate the benefits. For further information, contact Larry Convoy at lconvoy@emailcma.org or 818-972-5323.

When a Group Can Safely Say “We Should Do This,” by Larry Convoy

The first word all Industry Credit Group facilitators are taught to listen for at a group meeting is WE, as in WE should all stop selling or WE should all put him on COD. This is the most severe of the Anti-Trust violations, and collusion like this can cost companies millions in lawsuits and fines.

However, there is a circumstance where the group can invoke the WE word as in WE, the members of the CMA Industry Credit Group, would like the CMA Adjustment Bureau to contact our mutual customer to assist them in dealing with creditors during a rough period. In this circumstance, the role of the Adjustment Bureau, group members and other creditors is to keep this business operational while it works on a plan to resolve the issues that caused the problem and propose a repayment schedule.

Under this arrangement, creditors put off any legal demands for payment, agree to keep selling the customer and with a CMA staff member supervising, monitor the affairs of the business to insure that everything possible is being done to satisfy all parties. The cost to the group is ZERO.

Sounds too good to be true? In some cases it is and there is no solution to save the business. CMA’s Adjustment Bureau can provide a service to liquidate the company and make sure that ALL creditors receive their pro-rata share of the proceeds.

Sometimes, through no fault of their own, good companies have rough times. You can choose to deal with them by revoking terms, placing them for collection and if enough do, guarantee that this business will fold and you will receive pennies on the dollar or you can work with CMA and the debtor to save the business, recover all or a significant portion of your old debt and continue to have a customer for years to come.

If you group has a situation like this or if you want further information on this process, call Molly Froschauer at 818-972-5315.

We can make a difference.

You Want me to Tell My Competitors WHAT?, by Larry Convoy

Finding companies that would fit in your industry credit group is not a difficult task. There are trade publications, mailing lists, associations and websites where you can input a company name and receive a list of that company’s competitors. The challenge is convincing an owner who has never been involved in a group to allow his credit manager to sit down with the competition and discuss their customers’ paying habits. To an “old school” individual, this is against every business principle they know. So how do we (and I am including officers and
current members) communicate the advantages when this would involve working with the enemy?

One method is waiting for the opportune time. Recently, a group approached a company owner that lost a great deal of money by not knowing that a bankruptcy was approaching. His pain was magnified when he learned that his competitors were aware of the problem months before and reduced their exposure. They will join the group if they survive.

Another method is owner-to-owner direct contact. Chances are, some member of the group has an owner or executive who knows the right person at the prospect company. A phone call explaining how the group has saved them $$$, reduced money spent on report contracts, lowered write-offs and improved their credit departments efficiency through the Best Practices exchange, carries a great deal of weight.

Finding, vetting and securing new members is a task requiring group members and the group facilitator working together. Keep in mind the selling points that convinced your company to join and apply them to any potential prospects.

The whole of Group participation is far greater than simply the sum of its parts. In your next Group meeting, let us know who we’re missing.

Thanks so much!

Larry Convoy
Lead Group Facilitator

Goodbye to Another Old Friend, by Larry Convoy

It seems that each month, a different industry feels the pain of losing one or more of their big players. It started in the Electronics industry a few years with Circuit City, moved over to the Grocery chains, department stores and last month it hit the Sporting Goods industry with 2 majors closing their doors. Besides having an impact on those who are losing their jobs, the amount of revenue these Big Box dealers generated may have been the only thing keeping some manufacturers profitable.

Fortunately, the members of one of our industry trade groups saw some warning signs several months ago and took action. They made this account a permanent one for meeting review, meaning it showed up as an RFI every month automatically. They monitored newspaper stories and internet reports and had their group facilitator distribute. They made it a regular account clearance on all conference calls, shared any information they received and individually took action to reduce their company’s exposure. A conservative estimate shows them being 3-5 months ahead in identifying trends than non-members.

As a result, they are in a better position to absorb any potential loss, certainly in a better position than some non-group members who have large exposures because they were not involved in the discussions over the last several months.

Many times when we approach a potential group member, their response is: “I only extend credit to Fortune 500 companies.” I am sure that those dealing with A&P, Haggens Food, Circuit City, Sport Chalet, Sports Authority, Blockbuster, Borders and Radio Shack to name a few all felt that they had a good handle on it.

We congratulate our industry group that identified a potential problem and took steps early to reduce their pain. The small financial investment they made in joining and participating in a group has paid off handsomely.

As we start a new “group year” with our new fiscal year beginning May 1, we encourage you to use all the tools CMA has to make sure you have the most current information on your customers, large and small.

Thanks for reading!

You Make the Call, by Larry Convoy

We are just barely into the year 2016 and already I am hearing excuses as to why the credit manager cannot attend the industry credit group meetings to which they belong. They range from the receptionist is out to my controller wants me to stay and call customers.

Attending credit meetings provide your best Return on Investment by reducing bad debt loss, identifying slow paying accounts, and lowering your financial dependence on credit reports I contend that blindly calling a number in your system is more time consuming and less efficient.

Calling for dollars requires preparation

  1. Are you calling a specific person or a/p?
  2. Who is the person who controls the checkbook?
  3. Is there a gatekeeper blocking you?
  4. Have you previously left voicemails?
  5. Who does that person report to?
  6. How often do they cut checks?
  7. Are there orders in house or on hold?

A good group can identify numbers 1, 2 and 5 & 6. And supply a direct extension to avoid # 3. Number 4 tells you how important you are to them and you know #7.

I say it every month. Group Meetings are not social events for the credit manager, they are an attempt to maximize your company’s revenue. If you bring the names of past-due accounts that you will be calling for money to a meeting, I guarantee you that the information you receive will increase your percentage of recovery significantly.

You are now ready to call for dollars. You have all the facts you need and this should be resolved in one call. Feel free to contact me at lconvoy@emailcma.org if you’re not in a group and I’ll help you identify one that might be a good fit for you.

Welcome Back, by Larry Convoy

To some, January 1st is like the first day of school. Everything starts out fresh and clean (even though I know many of your fiscal years start at different times of the year). For those group members who attend and contribute regularly, the beginning of the year is just a continuation of what you have done in the past.

However, some of you have not attended your Industry Credit Group meetings in months (and for others years) and you may feel a bit embarrassed showing up. Others may not be in an Industry Credit Group at all.

As someone who has facilitated meetings longer than many of you have been alive, let me inform you that nothing could be further from the truth. Your contributions and attendance will be welcomed by all, whether it is at a meeting or joining a conference call. By including your trade data and credit knowledge, the other members have more information to make informed credit decisions. The real embarrassment would be you opening an account that the other group members have previously discussed and determined individually to be risky.

There are two ways to increase the value of an Industry Credit Group; bring in new members and bring back current members who have for whatever reason, have gone astray. Either way, EVERYONE WINS.

As we begin a new year, we ask you on behalf of the other members of your group, to commit to attending each meeting/call, to contribute daily through alerts, RFIs and monthly if your group has a report. Take your calendar and mark off the meeting days for the entire year so nothing else can be scheduled during that time period. Prepare the accounts you wish to discuss prior to the meeting and any topic you would like to bring up. Let’s make 2016 the Year of the Group.

Happy New Year!

The Twelve Days of Christmas, Industry Credit Group Style, by Larry Convoy

Over the last 5 years, I have written approximately 55 newsletters preaching the value of Industry Credit Groups and encouraging your participation. I do this because I believe that a credit group is the single most valuable resource a credit manager can have. In the spirit of giving, Groups give you valuable data that many times you can only get from the Industry Credit Groups (and more importantly, being engaged in them). As you prepare for the holidays, think about these tips on how you and your company can reap the benefits of this modified Christmas Carole, THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS

  • 1st day … Mark all of your group’s meeting days for the year on your 2016 calendar so that time is locked in
  • 2nd day…Make sure that you and all of your credit staff is registered on www.anscers.com. If they aren’t familiar with the site (and all of its resources), call CMA’s Lisa Wong for training
  • 3rd day … Discuss benefits of A/R contributions with your boss if you’re not already contributing
  • 4th day …  Look at credit references received for potential new group members and offer to call
  • 5th day… Make sure all RFIs have been responded to
  • 6th day… Check aging for any unusual slowness and enter those accounts as alerts
  • 7th day … Contact CMA to inquire about volunteering to assist any committees needing new people and new ideas
  • 8th day… Lead discussion regarding what peripheral industries or companies might fit in group due to common customers and let us help get them to join the group
  • 9th day… Participate in the meetings. Group membership usually pays for itself 10 times over due to advance knowledge of risky accounts. We encourage you to become engaged in your Group!
  • 10th day… If you’re not currently in group, call CMA to see if one exists in your industry
  • 11th day… If no group exists, gather a list of competitors and offer to assist in contacting
  • 12th day… Take a break, you have earned it

Have the Happiest of Holiday Seasons and a Healthy New Year
Larry Convoy

The Price is Right for Industry Credit Group Membership, by Larry Convoy

There’s a lot that’s bundled in the $99 a month Industry Credit Group dues that group members pay. But, for sake of argument, let’s pretend for a moment that CMA unbundled those items and that you had to pay for each of those benefits separately.

Many service providers, including CMA, have weighed the advantages of an unbundled price structure versus a bundled one; to charge for each item or service as opposed to a monthly fee. I have devised the following pricelist and an approximate cost for a typical month in most groups to see what that $99 a month really gets you.

INDUSTRY GROUP STATEMENT FOR COMPANY XYZ FOR OCTOBER, 2015

  • Received 10 RFIs in month @ $22.50(cost of average Experian or Dun & Bradstreet, most groups use double that amount)
  • 12 NSF check notifications @ $5 each
  • 4 placed for collection notices @$50 each
  • 1 change of owner announcement -NO CHARGE
  • 1 Chapter 7 bankruptcy alerts @ $500
  • 2 “business is closed” alerts @ $250 each
  • 1 mechanic’s lien filed @ $300
  • 4 clearances at group meeting @ $5 each
  • Educated by group member on various topics-PRICELESS
  • Recommendation NOT TO BUY computer system or software package by member-$10,000
  • Informed of new A/P contact at customer’s or owner’s cell phone #- NO CHARGE

This adds up to $11,805 for one month, considerably higher than the bundled price of $99/month now charged to most groups. This does not include a Past Due list or Meeting Review reports.

While I do not think this will ever become the standard, it does make you realize how cost effective participation in a group is. The more RFIs submitted and alerts posted, the Return on Investment becomes even greater.

With the holidays upon us, make sure you set aside time to attend the meetings and submit your reports. The survival of many businesses will be determined in the next 2 months.

Have a great November,

Larry Convoy

It’s a Wonderful Credit Group, by Larry Convoy

Some of you remember the great Jimmy Stewart movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” in which he envisions what life would have been like if he wasn’t born and its effect on his loved ones. At the conclusion, he is thrilled that it was only a dream and realized how good he actually had it.

Consider what your life would be if Industry Credit Groups did not exist and its effect on your company’s bottom line. You can put any music or special effect to signify that a dream sequence is next.

Without an Industry Credit Group, how would you know?

• If your new customer came to you because of your product and not because everyone else in the industry has taken him legal
• If there was changes in management or key personnel
• If they are ignoring phone calls from other suppliers or passing bad checks
• How high in dollars and far in days are they are extended with others in your industry
• Who controls the checkbook, or who to really contact for payment,
• Recommendations for software, service providers, legal experts
• If they filed BK, had liens placed, or worse, if they are GONE

You can relax. If you are a member of a credit group, you have access to all this information. You can enter alerts and respond to RFIs (or contribute your A/R). You can network with your peers and exchange the latest Best Practices. Hopefully, your management’s support allows attending the meeting/conference call a priority.

Relax, This was just a dream.

Larry Convoy
Credit Management Association
Lead Group Facilitator

March Madness, 12 months a year, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator
Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

It occurred to me while watching Kentucky annihilate another opponent on their way to a possible NCAA title, that there are many similarities between a championship basketball team and a successful Industry Credit Group.

Both need a strong point guard, someone to lead the meeting, keep it focused and moving forward and keep all players or attendees engaged and contributing. This person must be able to bring the topic back when it gets off track yet not dominate the ball or conversation.

Each must have a big man or major company to go to when the offense is sputtering. This person has all the tools and resources to take the pressure off the other members simply because of the size of their company and their customer base. Just like LeBron James can take control of a game for an extended period of time, this credit representative can go on a run during the account and Best Practices discussion.

Teams and groups need veterans to remind us of the past and to not repeat mistakes. Most groups have a historian who remembers the risky accounts from when they stuck a member 3 Businesses ago. When the pressure is on, they come through.

Both also need a strong bench, role players who will do their job every game or meeting. For a group, it means contributing, entering alerts, RFI’s and attending every meeting prepared and willing to play any position required. Over the years, I have seen many role players develop into stars.

And finally, they both need a coach or facilitator to make sure they are organized, in their correct spot on the court at the appropriate time and work as a team

For in credit like sports, you are expected to win, and losing or LOSSES are not acceptable.

Let’s adopt the Postman’s credo; neither rain nor sleet…, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator
Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

I have often wondered how industry groups are able to hold meetings in the winter in the Middle and Northeast parts of the country. Last month, I experienced this when one of my National groups met in Nashville. The temperature went from a high of 18* to a low of -3* with the wind-chill and ice making it much worse. Even under these conditions we had 7 out of 11 members attend. We would have had 9 at the meeting but extremely dangerous road conditions prevented the members from Kentucky and Alabama from driving there.

I bring this up because every month I received emails from members informing me that they will not be able to make a local meeting and conference call for reasons that most would consider trivial. The excuses given that amazes me most was for the conference call. What could be easier to attend, you do not even have to stand up. Yet, statistics show that less than 50% of the members are on the call. Can a group meeting be made any easier?

Let’s compare the time, cost and effort required between the National, Local and Conference Call

  • Time- 2 ½ days vs 2 hours vs 1 hour
  • Cost- $500-$750 vs luncheon fee vs $0
  • Temp- 18* vs Calif/Nevada temp vs your office temp.

Groups only work when everyone participates and contributes. Your company has made a commitment and as its representative, it is your responsibility to fulfill it.

And to those 7 brave souls who agreed with my recommendation to meet in Nashville in February, my sincerest apologies.

…And Seated to my Right…, by Larry Convoy

Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator
Larry Convoy, lead group facilitator

Recently, I discovered that a longtime CMA and group member had played college basketball not far from where I went to school.  A few years ago, I found out that gentleman who sat next to me at a group meeting was a decorated hero from the Korean War.  Unfortunately, both discoveries were a result of reading their obituaries.

Today, with Facebook and Twitter posting everyone’s daily activities, likes and dislikes out there for all to see, I am still amazed at how little I know about some people that I have had lunch with every month for decades at the group meetings. On Tuesday, I discovered that a member had attended the same concert I went to on Friday at Staples Center, the night before in Fresno. Our conversations will now extend past contributing and attending when I call her.

You already share a profession with the people sitting at your niche group meeting. The possibilities are unlimited for other things in common; schools attended, companies worked for, favorite teams, hobbies, vacation spots.

My goal has always been to get more information and participation from the members of groups in an effort to get critical mass. Groups do not have to be just alerts and past dues. For those who insist that we stay focused on Business, consider that forging these relationships might result in some advanced warnings about a problem account.

Take a few minutes at your next group meeting, put down the aging report and find out what movie the person on your right thinks will win the Oscar, or how they got in credit.

Years from now, I don’t want you to read that we were both diehard Yankee fans.

Wanted: People in Your Niche Market, by Larry Convoy

Industry credit groups and networks offer CMA members a unique opportunity to network with other credit professionals in their industry.

From July 2013 to June 2014, credit groups exchanged information on transactions in excess of $3.5B. More than 8,680 companies were discussed with advanced notice on $104.5M in total balances greater than 91 days past due.

Credit Management Association offers more than 60 industry credit groups and networks at the local and national level; including food and beverage, construction, health care equipment and more. Active participation in these groups is rated as a top benefit that the association offers.

CMA has been approached by its members to investigate the viability of forming several new credit networks. Here are the proposed new networks we are researching and developing:

  • Fuel Credit Network: Wholesale Fuel, Seiberts Oil, Boyett Petroleum and Robert V Jensen are looking to expand their credit network of fuel jobbers and distributors selling to stations, farmers and business accounts.
  • Animal Feed and Supply Store Network: With champions from Western Milling and Associated Feed behind the formation of this network, it should fill the void of information on retail feed and supply stores.
  • Supply Chain Management Network: Vendor analysis has become a greater priority with many companies. Two experts in the field are leading the push for this CMA network, we hope to start a Best Practices Bulletin Board in the next 60 days.

In all cases, contact me at lconvoy@emailcma.org or 818-972-5323 if you’re interested in joining these groups (or have any ideas of other ones you think we should form.

Thanks for your consideration!