From Policy to Profit: The Value of Having an International Credit Policy and Procedures, by Eddy Sumar


Many believe that having a credit policy is very restrictive, while others say it is not needed because the world is constantly changing and it is difficult to keep up the pace. Yet a third group touts its value in a changing world. From these samplings of answers and beliefs, we can say that credit policies need to be put in the proper perspective and place.

What Policies and Procedures Are and Are Not

Policies and procedures are not a straightjacket. And if they are to be restrictive, it should be with a compelling reason and cause. In fact, they should act as a seat belt that can be expanded or contracted depending on the situation and circumstances. They should not be used as a platform to penalize and punish. They are not meant to be rigid, capricious and inflexible. Though they convey permanency, they are not permanent. Policies and procedures are set to facilitate, not debilitate, the business process. They are set to empower, not to enslave. Policies and procedures are dynamic and they should serve the company as well as the customer. They should be reviewed periodically to ensure that they reflect up-to-date requirements and the real business climate and environment.

When we look at credit policies and procedures from a wider perspective, we can clearly see that they serve an important purpose and a vital role in the health of the organization. They act as strategic guides that point to the direction and path that need to be followed. They spell the tactics that need to be employed, on a daily basis, to ensure control and compliance.

Policies and procedures should be used as guidelines and a platform to facilitate the company’s operations. They create a map that every member of the business enterprise can use to ensure the smooth handling of the tactical and day-to-day operations, as well as to gain insight into the strategic intent of Company. Policies and procedures, if conveyed properly to the sales team and the customer, could help all understand the why, why things happen in a certain fashion. Educating all stakeholders on the Company’s policies and procedures will ensure not only excellence in performance but will result in a more satisfied customer.

In short, policies and procedures are a NEED. Companies need them to safeguard their financial stability and prosperity.

The Five Cs

When a company constructs its policies and procedures, they need to build them on the Five C’s:

1. Compliance
2. Communication
3. Coaching
4. Consistency
5. Cashflow

Compliance: We live in a highly-regulated environment. And companies, both domestic and international, act and interact in this environment. Thus, they need to be aware and compliant with the demands and requirements that the environment presents. No company can afford to be found lacking and non-compliant. International Credit Managers perform strict due diligence on country and client. They ask their prospects and clients to fill out a credit application. They verify, inquire, investigate, obtain credit reports, perform non-financial and financial analysis, employ the AW Matrix, and they cross-check every C of credit before they make a credit-decision. In fact, credit decision makers must be well informed and up-to-date on every development in the environment.

Communication: Credit policies and procedures are a communication tool. Thus, they need to be clear, concise, relevant, and timely. They communicate the vision and mission of the organization and its departments. They are used to communicate with internal and external customers. They communicate goals, expectations, and KPIs. They explain processes and procedures step-by-step. In fact, credit decision makers should use their policies as a vehicle to communicate and build understanding, collaboration, and buy-ins.

Coaching: Because of the detailed nature of policies and procedures, credit professionals should use them as a coaching and training vehicle. They should use them as a tool for coaching and developing employees and clients. When used for coaching, they become easy to adopt and implement. Policies and procedures should be used as a vital component of training manuals and new hire orientation training. In fact, a credit policy and procedure manual should be a book that codifies the existing body of functional, technical, and experiential knowledge to preserve it and later transmit it when needed.

Consistency: A Credit policy, when shared with all stakeholders, pursued zealously, and followed closely should result in consistency and stability. A credit policy spells the path and the steps to be taken as well as provide the guides for well-informed decisions and common sense, intuitive decisions. When all follow the policy with common sense empowerment, then consistency will reign and goodwill will expand.

Cashflow: As the title of this article conveys, policies should lead to profit and expansion of profit. When a company follows its policy, and ensures compliance, it will protect itself from lawsuits and penalties. When a company follows its policy, and ensures that its communication is clear, concise, relevant and timely, then it can save time, efforts, and money in dealing with complaints and internal and external customer issues. When a company follows its policy, and uses it as a coaching tool, then it can save time and money in looking for new personnel and even new clients. Coaching helps training and retaining of employees and clients. When a company follows its policy, and ensures consistency, then it can save enormous amount of resources on reworks, defects, low morale, employee turn-over and loss of customers. And when a company follows its policy, and ensures it cashflow, it has indeed not only protected its profit, but actually realized it when cash was collected and deposited.

I know of a company that has a policy of reviewing its key accounts daily. Every member of the credit department as well as their sales team is daily involved in a debriefing on these key accounts. The consistent application of this policy helped the company reduce its bad debt account and expedite its collection results. Consistent application of policies and procedures PAYS!

In short, a credit policy is not a want or a desire, it is a need that can protect cashflow, realize profit, and create expansion.

Eddy A. Sumar is the President & Founder of ERS Consulting Services. He is a frequent contributor for CMA, and a longtime speaker and educator on international credit related issues. He spoke at a recent International Best Practices Forum meeting, the recording of which is available on demand. He can be reached at 909-481-9869 or ealberto@aol.com.

Future Dates Set for International Credit Best Practices Forum Meetings

The inaugural international credit best practices forum, which took place in January, was an overwhelming success amongst CMA members, as dozens listened in on the conversation led by international trade expert Gary Mendell of Meridian Finance. Based on the success of the meeting, CMA has scheduled the subsequent monthly meetings, which are listed below. Each meeting will address a to-be-determined different international topic, with a 20-to-30 minute discussion led by a thought leader, a question-and-answer session and open forum.

 

The dates (and links to register) are as follows:

These meetings, which are delivered in online webinar format, are subject to special pricing of $20 per meeting for members, while non CMA members will pay $30.

 

For more information about how you can get involved, contact Alan Dicker at adicker@emailcma.org or 323-573-0840.

Credit Resources for Companies Selling Internationally, by Patrick Spargur

There is a saying, “When in Rome, do as the Romans.” That is a simple way to remember how to approach International Mitigation Tools. If your company decides to enter a new International market, as a credit manager (and risk management professional) you must be aware of the most common mitigation techniques that are used.

In my previous role as a Global Credit & Collection Manager, I was responsible for mitigating credit risk on six continents. In order to do this, I needed to ask a lot of questions and do a lot of research to find out what the most common mitigation tools were for each country, remembering that the laws and business practices in these different countries varied greatly.

These are just a few mitigation tools that I learned about as a credit manager:

  • personal guaranty
  • promissory note
  • pledge agreement
  • pagare-Mexico
  • letters of exchange-Peru
  • bank guaranty
  • letter of credit (confirmed & unconfirmed)
  • irrevocable letter of credit
  • standby letter of credit
  • cross corporate guaranty
  • credit insurance
  • postdated checks
  • surety bond
  • factoring
  • forfaiting
  • cash for documents

Depending on the country(ies) you’re doing business with, this list gets even longer. The aforementioned list does provide you with an idea of how complex International trade can be and how much there is to learn. The good news is that CMA has the experience, members, partners and the educational offerings to help you navigate and understand these techniques and tools, as well as many other issues affecting trade credit and International business.

One of these resources is a newly created International Best Practices Group whose first meeting takes place via teleconference January 23. You can sign up here. If your company sells internationally, or you plan to at some point, I strongly encourage you to take advantage of the knowledge presented in this group by your peers and industry experts.

Please call or email me with any questions or comments that you have, 702-259-2622.

All the best wishes for a prosperous New Year!

Patrick Spargur, CICP
800-841-5793

CMA President’s Blog: Join CMA’s New International Credit Best Practices Group, by Mike Mitchell

CMA President and CEO Mike Mitchell
CMA President and CEO Mike Mitchell

We live in a global economy where many of the trading lines that used to go from state to state now stretch from country to country. Our businesses sell to places in the world where the political climate is volatile and it is the credit professional’s job to protect their company’s A/R and ensure they get paid on the deals they accept.

More and more, I have credit professionals asking me how CMA can help them assess the risk involved in selling to different countries, where they can find information and reports about companies in their particular country, and which resources they can access to help sell abroad. In our ongoing effort to help members with mitigating risk, we recently surveyed our members for input on the best ways for CMA to help members sell internationally.

Based on the results of the survey, I am pleased to announce the formation of a new International Credit Best Practices Group, a monthly virtual meeting for credit professionals from different industries to exchange best practices in international credit sales. Each meeting will feature an expert in one of the many areas of international credit, including credit reporting, credit insurance and international business consulting. Each meeting will allow time for participants to share their own knowledge, and get advice from the rest of the group to help address their own specific issues.

If you manage international credit sales for your company, please join us for the FREE inaugural meeting of the International Credit Best Practices Group on January 23, 2017 from 10 am – 11 am PST. We will be joined by several experts, including Gary Mendell and Robina Peanh of Meridian Finance, and Eddy Sumar of ERS Consulting, who will share expertise about getting started in international business and where to find information about assessing country risk. The event will be held via web conference, and you can sign up on the anscers.com Education page.

The Group is an excellent place for companies who sell internationally (or plan to in the future) to hear from experts who will share best practices, tips and tricks to help companies minimize the risk associated with selling overseas. During the initial meeting, your input will help the group determine topics for upcoming meetings, allowing CMA to build a series of agendas for topics that will help your business.

We hope that this new Group will provide you with the knowledge and tools you need to help your company compete in the global marketplace. I look forward to participating with you early next year.

President’s Blog: CMA’s International Focus, by Mike Mitchell, CAE

CMA President and CEO Mike Mitchell
CMA President and CEO Mike Mitchell

As the Olympics wind down this week, I wonder if any of our CMA members did business with companies in Rio before or during the international games? Or more generally, how many members currently export to Brazil? This serves to remind us that international credit sales will continue to grow as global commerce continues to evolve. As the economy becomes more and more globally focused, I wanted to take this opportunity to let our members know about some international tools and resources that are now available or coming soon to a California venue near you:

International trade data now available on the NACM NTCR. Many NACM members report their international trade to the NACM National Trade Database, which is now available to CMA members in the enhanced version of the NTCR launched last week. Additional international trade data is available from Skyminder, Experian, Dun & Bradstreet, and Equifax Canadian.

International credit topics included in upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit. International credit guru Paul Beretz, CICE, will lead a panel discussion about “how to get to YES” which will include many international credit tools, resources, and remedies. If your company exports or is developing export markets for the future, you better call Paul.

Understanding International Credit. In October, Eddy Sumar, MBA, CCE, CICE, and CEW will take you on an exciting journey through the world of international credit. If your company engages in limited exports or none at all, Eddy’s boundless energy and expertise in export trade credit will make you wish it did. His popular and engaging seminar will highlight resources made available through CMA’s partnership with U.S. Department of Commerce and other government agencies.

West Coast Trade and Working Capital Conference. In November, the Global Trade Review (GTR) will host experts from various trade finance sectors to discuss how global markets have impacted trade for both corporations and banks, an update on current capital needs and availability. Gary Mendell, President of credit insurance broker Meridian Finance, and long-time supporter of CMA’s members, has recommended this conference in San Jose because he believes that it is one of the best international forums he attends each year.

Even though most CMA members do not engage in significant exporting, we believe it is important for CMA to remain committed to providing international credit resources to support the growing trend toward global sales.

What are your biggest challenges in international credit? I’d love to hear your feedback.

How CMA Can Help Members Navigate the Global Credit Landscape, by Mike Mitchell

Companies cannot ignore the fact that there is a whole world out there to sell to, and despite thct that current global economic conditions do not favor U.S. exports, there are tremendous opportunities for companies that can and have figured out how to sell to foreign markets on favorable terms. Global commerce is more than a trend – it is a certainty, and because export sales require the support of the credit operation, CMA will continue to include international credit in all education and training programs.

In an effort to determine how far CMA should go to support international credit sales, I have recently attended events that focused on the broader topic of exporting and events that addressed specific credit issues related to international sales. Here are a few things I’ve learned so far.

Most emerging markets are outside the U.S. Middle class growth and urbanization is taking place in China, India, and throughout Asia, not in the U.S. It is estimated that the global middle class will triple in size to 4.9 billion people by 2050, and they will spend an estimated $56 trillion by 2030. Two-thirds of that spending will come from emerging markets. This will create not only a huge opportunity for growth, but may put a demand on U.S. companies to sell into emerging markets just to stay competitive and not get left behind.

A surprising number of exporters are small and medium-sized enterprises (just like most of our members), and new free-trade agreements, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP), are giving SMEs greater access to emerging markets.

There are a surprising number of Federal and State agencies that provide free and low-cost assistance for exporters. U.S. Department of Commerce Commercial Services, Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Centers, Export Assistance Centers, the newly reauthorized EXIM Bank, and a vast network of partner programs are there to help your company export. The challenge is that there is overlap among these agencies and the overwhelming number of resources can be difficult to navigate. CMA has established strategic partnerships with the International Trade Administration (U.S. DOC), the SBA in Glendale, CA, and the EXIM Bank to better understand how to bring these resources to our members that currently export or plan to in the near future.

Due to the cost of Letters of Credit to foreign buyers, more international sales are shifting to open credit terms, which decreases barriers to sales but increases the risk. At CMA’s upcoming CreditScape Spring Summit and Annual Meeting, a panel of seasoned international credit managers will discuss why overseas customers are demanding more credit in 2016, tools for evaluating the creditworthiness of foreign companies, when to (or not to) extend higher credit limits or longer terms, what are the real risks today of giving payment terms abroad, and companywide credit strategies for growing international sales.

If your company already sells outside the U.S. and your credit department already has a solid process in place for managing trade risk, then much if not all of what I’ve said is not news to you. However, my guess is that many of you have little to no experience exporting, and chances are that if your company produces a product that is marketable to other countries, you will be asked to provide support for international sales. The question is, how can CMA help you find the knowledge, information, services, and professional training to ensure you are ready to take on the challenges of global commerce? As we continue to explore trends in international sales, let us know how CMA can offer assistance to your company to help you win in the global marketplace.

Rich Swanson, USFCS Pacific South Region, and Mike Mitchell, CAE, President & CEO, CMA (Credit Management Association) sign the MOA at the CreditScape Conference at the Palms Hotel, Las Vegas on Thursday, October 16, 2014.
Rich Swanson, USFCS Pacific South Region, and Mike Mitchell, CAE, President & CEO, CMA (Credit Management Association) sign the MOA at the CreditScape Conference at the Palms Hotel, Las Vegas on Thursday, October 16, 2014.

Selling outside the U.S.? What risks should you look for?, by Mike Lindenmuth

Consider this scenario: your boss tells you, the credit manager, that he/she’s just sold a palletload of your company’s widgets to a customer in a foreign country, and that you need to just “make it work and collect the money.” Sound familiar? We hear examples like that one over and over from our clients. So what are the risks that you should look out for? There are three major country factors that we look for that determine foreign risk: economic, political and terrorism.

Economic Risk

In a global economy, some countries are connected in a virtual domino effect, some obviously and others not. For example, imagine that your boss asks you to do business with an Australian company. At the same time, you are aware of the political unrest in Greece. If Greece defaults, Germany would be impacted as they are a major economic trading partner and major debt holder. This could impact the company you’re doing business with, as Germany is a major trading partner with Australia. Therefore, if you’re doing business in Australia, you could be impacted by the situation in Greece, even though Greece isn’t a major trading partner with Australia.

Regional country risk could also be a factor. For instance, Venezuela literally has no cash available to pay its creditors, and this would impact your company’s ability to get paid.

Finally, you still need to assess the company risk, based on a number of factors including capacity and character. Some of this information can be obtained through reports and assessments from companies like Skyminder.

Political Risk

Imagine this scenario: You have an agreement in place with a foreign customer, and then a revolution breaks out in their country. Despite their best efforts and intentions, the deal is off, and they may not be able to ship out or pay for those products. Similarly, in other countries, governments have the ability to take over private companies, and there’s very little the owner can do to stop it.

Another political factor is the type and structure of the government. For instance, look at the current stock market in China. Dictatorship controls the market and valuation of yen. Which could be strong (or weaK) compared to U.S. dollars at the time of the transaction. Could your company be left holding the proverbial “bag?”

Finally, the U.S. government could be a factor. In the case of Russia invading Ukraine, will our Congress impose sanctions? If so, is your company prepared?

Terrorism

In a post 9/11 world, terrorism is a huge (and self-explanatory) factor.

How can you make an informed decision?

With all of the uncertainty I’ve been talking about in this blog post, how can you make an informed decision? There are a couple of resources that I can recommend.

  • FCIB is an excellent source for country reports, political risk and credit and collections surveys.
  • For company risk, no one should use a single source for business information reports. Effective risk management requires access to multiple sources. The preferred solution is to look to providers who can aggregate information from multiple sources. My company, SkyMinder, is able to provide freshly investigated reports for any company in any country in the world.

Mike Lindenmuth is Vice President of SkyMinder, a provider of global company and domestic credit reports. He can be reached at 813-636-0981 ext. 237, m.lindenmuth@c3bizinfo.com, or at www.c3bizinfo.com.

What creates the need for financing international growth, by Brent Hoots

Note: this is one in a series of international blogs to help credit managers learn how to assess risk in foreign countries and expand their potential customer base.

As a consultant, NaviTrade is approached by companies on a regular basis asking for our assistance in developing and implementing financing programs for their international business. Sometimes companies are frustrated about and even confused as to the need for financing. In fact, we often times see the need for foreign receivables financing as a natural outcome of successful international growth strategies that in part define a company headed in the right direction. To gain a better understanding of this issue, it’s productive to consider the many views of key management team members at typical small to medium-sized companies, including the following:

VP of International Sales – often times tasked with growing a business globally, a VP in this position may find several very attractive overseas markets. To succeed in these markets, the best strategies may require relationships with strategic partners in certain markets – often distributors – that can lead the company to successful market penetrations and substantial sales.

What does it take to make a relationship with an overseas distributor work? Many things, of course, including some level of understanding of the financing constraints facing the distributor. Overseas distributors are often thinly capitalized (i.e., they don’t have much money to work with!) and are looking for substantial open account terms to match their cash flow cycle. Distributor cash flow cycle means what? Let’s say the overseas distributor places an order with your company, it takes 30 days to receive the goods, they spend 30 days getting the product out into the market, then they get paid by the retailer 30 days after that – we would call this a 90 day “distributor cash flow cycle” from the point of view of the U.S. company. But wait! Isn’t the 90 day distributor cash flow cycle the distributor’s problem – not ours?! Right?! No – this is very much the U.S. company’s problem too!

If this topic is of interest to you, I invite you to join me for a free 45-minute Webinar on December 2 at 9am PST to delve deeper into this issue, take a further look at the views of the Credit Manager, CFO, and CEO, and investigate how this all relates to and where we ultimately find a financing solution!

Brent Hoots is president of NaviTrade Structured Finance LLC (NaviTrade), a financial advisory and brokerage firm that specializes in helping U.S. and overseas companies and financial institutions finance international transactions, better manage overseas risks and marketing related issues, and achieve their global potential. He can be reached at (720) 841-6371 or by email at bhoots@navitrade.com.

A Comparison of Credit Risk Mitigation Tools, by Buddy Baker

Note: this is one in a series of international blogs to help credit managers learn how to assess risk in foreign countries and expand their potential customer base.

Most CMA members don’t know me. I don’t make it to many CMA activities because I live in Chicago. But about a year ago, I joined CMA as a vendor member who provides credit-related services to CMA members.

I’d like to invite you to a short webinar I’ll be conducting on December 3. I think you’ll find the information to be useful and maybe even compelling. The webinar will be a review of multiple techniques for managing credit risk. Maybe you are familiar with all of them but never compared them side by side. I’ve attached a chart that should give you an idea of what I’ll be talking about.

You can sign up for the webinar here. http://www.anscers.com/upcomingevents.aspx?eventId=1840

Then, in January, I am planning to be in Los Angeles to conduct some classroom-style seminars on these techniques. If the webinar makes you decide you’d like to understand some of these techniques better or get some classroom practice at matching risks with risk-mitigation techniques, I hope you’ll come to one or more of these seminars. In addition to risk mitigation, one will be on structures for arranging financing for your domestic and international sales (much of which is built on the risk mitigation techniques). These seminars are not limited to CMA members, but CMA members will get a discount.

My objective is to provide education to Credit Managers. Information you can use. My experience-35 years of it-is as a banker and a credit insurer. I’m an expert in various techniques for managing credit risk and financing receivables, with particular expertise in export transactions. Please feel free to call me whenever you have a question about letters of credit or credit insurance or foreign exchange contracts.

And I look forward to getting to Los Angeles, and out of Chicago, in January.

Buddy Baker

Buddy Baker is president of Global Trade Risk Management Strategies, LLC, a consulting firm that specializes in providing education content to Credit Managers. Baker has 35 years of experience as a banker and a credit insurer, and is an expert in various techniques for managing credit risk and financing receivables, with particular expertise in export transactions. He can be reached at (847) 830-3038, or by email at buddy.baker@gtrisk.com.

How to Achieve Procurement from Using Foreign Trade Zones, by David Harlow

Note: this is one in a series of international blogs to help credit managers learn how to assess risk in foreign countries and expand their potential customer base.

A Foreign-Trade Zone is a secure, access-restricted, Customs & Border Protection privileged area in or near a U.S. port of entry where merchandise both foreign and domestic may be admitted, stored, exhibited, manipulated, temporarily removed, manufactured, or destroyed duty-free! Duties, certain user fees and taxes are only assessed on products that are transferred out of the FTZ and imported into the United States for consumption. Products that are transferred out of the FTZ and exported abroad are exempt from any duty, user fees or taxes

Benefits:
1. Duty Deferral – Duties are only paid when imported merchandise is entered into the U.S. Customs territory.

2. Duty Avoidance – There are no duties paid on merchandise that is exported from a FTZ, transferred to another zone or destroyed. This eliminates the need to manage costly and time-consuming Duty Drawback programs.

3. Weekly Entry – Customs allow for a weekly entry processing, which benefits importers because the Merchandise Processing Fees are capped at $485 on a weekly basis, versus per shipment basis.

4. Fee Deferral – Harbor Maintenance Fee is paid quarterly and in a single payment.

5. Enhanced Security – By using a FTZ, the “internal controls” requirements of section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act are met. Participants in the Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program are eligible for additional benefits provided by Customs.

6. Expedited Logistics – relocating CHB to your facility and expedite the delivery to your facility without customs clearance. Potential savings is up to two days.

7. Ease of Paperwork – through automation of the FTZ, the paperwork submitted for receiving and the weekly entry program is greatly diminished with all parties and the processes for approval are expedited dramatically.

8. Manipulation – all manipulations are authorized and completed without physical Customs supervision. Goods are allowed to enter an FTZ and have the following manipulations: clean, repair, fix, improve in value, amend, exhibit, pick & pack, and many other functions.

If you’re interested in this topic, I encourage you to join me on December 1, 2015 for a free webinar on how you can use these trade zones to your company’s advantage. Register here: http://www.anscers.com/upcomingevents.aspx?eventId=1843

david harlow

David Harlow represents four of the nine Grantees in Southern California and assists regions, cities, and businesses with the implementation and oversight of the FTZ Program. Additionally, ITC provides services in eight different states while continuing to grow. ITC was founded in 2002 as an International Trade Consulting Firm and a second generation National Corporate Custom House Broker. ITC provides a unique blend of international trade related services to importers, exporters, manufacturers, distributors, public utilities, and local government, focusing on CBP and the Foreign Trade Zone. 

New International-Themed Webinar Series Announced to Help Members Think Global

Several international-themed webinars have been scheduled for early December in an effort to get CMA members to think globally.

The webinars, which will run 30 minutes each and are free for CMA members to attend, will take place December 1-3 at 9:00 AM PST. Descriptions for the webinars (and registration information) can be found at www.creditmanagementassociation.org/events.

  • December 1, 2015: How to Achieve Procurement From Using Foreign Trade Zones (Speaker: David Harlow, ITC-Diligence)
  • December 2, 2015: Financing Foreign Receivables (Speaker: Brent Hoots, NaviTrade)
  • December 3, 2015: Comparison of Credit Risk Mitigation Tools (Speaker: Buddy Baker, Global Trade Risk Management Strategies)

To echo the value of international education and resources to our members, CMA president and CEO Mike Mitchell dedicated his November blog to the topic.

For more information about these webinars or the CMA education program, contact Lisa Wong, CMA Member Relations Associate, at lwong@emailcma.org.

President’s Blog: It’s Time to Start Thinking Globally, By Mike Mitchell, President & CEO

How can you play and get paid in the global marketplace? Over the last two years, CMA has been exploring how member companies can grow export sales using a variety of credit and trade finance resources to mitigate the risk of selling into other countries.

Today, I am attending Discover Global Markets, a two-day export conference hosted by the U.S. Commercial Service, the trade promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (http://export.gov/discoverglobalmarkets). I am looking for information and insights I can bring back to the CMA membership.

In the meantime, we have many other resources that can help you sell into the global marketplace. CMA established a strategic alliance with the U.S. DOC’s Commercial Services because its trade professionals in over 100 U.S. cities and in more than 75 countries help U.S. companies get started in exporting or increase sales to new global markets (http://www.trade.gov/cs). Regional Director Richard Swanson recently participated in a panel discussion on international collections at CMA’s Fall CreditScape Summit, and he has provided CMA members with guidance on how to access U.S. government export resources in many other countries. You can also find all the basics at www.export.gov.

When you conduct international credit investigations, CMA recommends long-time partner Skyminder which offers reliable, up-to date information on millions of public and private companies worldwide. Details on how to find them are here.

CMA has three upcoming webinars before the end of the year that will give you more tools for exporting your products and securing your receivables.

  • December 1, 2015: How to Achieve Procurement Using Foreign Trade Zones (Free Webinar) 9:00 AM PST
  • December 2, 2015: Financing Foreign Receivables (Free Webinar) 9:00 AM PST
  • December 3, 2015: Comparison of Credit Risk Mitigation Tools (Free Webinar) 9:00 AM PST

Details on these can be found at http://www.anscers.com/upcomingevents.aspx

Is your company missing out on the other 95% of the world market? Stay tuned.

International Business — How Understanding Culture Will Help You Get Paid, by Eddy Sumar

When someone signs a contract to do business with your company, you allow them to do so with the expectation that they will pay you. In the U.S., there are laws that help protect your assets to ensure that the contract is enforceable, but what happens when you’re dealing with foreign nations? Are there resources (like the government) that can help when your customer doesn’t pay?

In this global economy, there are ingredients to succeeding in getting paid internationally. One of the key factors that I always recommend to my clients is to make sure you understand the culture of any company you’re selling to overseas. For instance, there are many cultures that have a strong family element to them. In some of those cultures, it is probable that the person who answers the phone is a daughter/son/spouse of the company owner. If that person has a negative experience with you (even if it’s perceived), you may never get to talk to the owner to enforce your contract and get paid.

There are plenty of other resources that can help as well. Join me as we cover this topic in detail at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit, September 17-18 at the Tropicana in Las Vegas. For more information about the conference, visit www.creditscapeconference.com. I hope to see you there.

Eddy A. Sumar is the President & Founder of ERS Consulting Services. He is also the director of education and community outreach for CMA, and will be speaking at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit. He can be reached at 909-481-9869 or ealberto@aol.com.

U.S. International Trade Administration to Offer Educational Resources to CMA Members

Credit Management Association® announced that it has entered into a strategic partnership with the International Trade Administration (ITA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC). The Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), titled the “U.S. Trade and Investment Expansion Partnership,” will help credit and risk management professionals gain access to educational resources needed to expand their businesses nationally and globally.

The agreement, which represents a relationship between CMA and the U.S. Department of Commerce, will promote international trade to CMA’s members by increasing awareness of the economic benefits of exporting, and educating them on trade activities as a job creation and growth strategy. As part of the agreement, CMA will work with the DOC to increase trade and business investment awareness among the U.S. business community, emphasizing the small- and medium-sized businesses that make up CMA.

Through this program, CMA and the DOC will jointly develop a series of educational webinars on topics such as the importance of trade and business investment and associated benefits to the economy, export and business investment opportunities, and ITA’s role in opening foreign markets to U.S. exporters. Additionally, this partnership creates the platform to engage in a dialog between CMA and the DOC. The program expands upon the resources of another CMA-sponsored service, the Global Trade Credit Consortium, which offers assistance for companies that sell internationally by providing access to letters of credit, international collections, banking resources, credit insurance, international credit reports and education and training.

“In this global economy, CMA is constantly evaluating which programs and services it offers that will help our members the most,” said CMA President Mike Mitchell. “Participation in this project furthers CMA’s programs such as the Global Trade Credit Consortium which encourages the economic growth of its members and other small and medium-sized businesses, and gives them access to some high-powered government resources on these topics. CMA is helping its members to better understand how to navigate and effectively compete in a global marketplace.”

“The function of the ITA is that it strengthens the competitiveness of U.S. industry, promotes trade and investment, and ensures fair trade through the rigorous enforcement of U.S. trade laws and agreements. ITA works to improve the global business environment and helps U.S. organizations compete at home and abroad,” said Eddy Sumar, CMA Director of Educational Services. “The goals of this U.S. Trade and Investment expansion partnership are to increase the economic benefits of trade; educate the public on trade activities as a job creation and growth strategy; to create general awareness of ITA and other government resources, and encourage U.S. businesses interested in exporting and foreign businesses interested in investing in the United States to seek the assistance of ITA. I can’t wait to announce some of the great training programs that we have planned.”

“In the coming months, CMA members will be reading more about these developments via CMA’s social media sites, blog, newsletter and other communications. I am very excited about the growth possibilities of this program,” Sumar added.

These educational sessions will complement the nearly 100 annual seminars, webinars, courses, conferences and training sessions that CMA offers. For details on other offerings, visit www.creditmanagementassociation.org/events.