CMA & NCS Form Strategic Partnership

NCS is CMA's Exclusive Provider to bring additional construction lien services, UCC filings to CMA customers

Partnership to expand CMA’s offerings to include additional construction lien services, UCC filings.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

LAS VEGAS, NV (Sept. 17, 2018)— Credit Management Association® (CMA), who provides extensive services to companies and corporations that sell goods and services through credit transactions, has formed a strategic partnership with NCS, the leading provider of notice, mechanic’s lien, UCC and secured collection services in the U.S. and Canada. This partnership will allow CMA to offer NCS’ breadth of service to CMA members, while providing additional benefits such as access to a variety of educational opportunities and industry leading resources. This partnership became effective September 4, 2018.

CMA will continue to provide best-in-class service and CMA’s members will benefit from NCS’ nearly 50 years of expertise in the commercial credit services market.

A long-standing relationship between CMA and NCS, coupled with NCS’ impeccable reputation within the credit community, provides a strong foundation for this strategic partnership. This partnership will add tremendous value for CMA’s wide base of construction-related companies. “As we’ve been looking to add to the benefits CMA offers its members, we decided that an alliance with NCS will provide an array of world-class educational offerings, the ability to offer UCC filing services, and improved synergies with the addition of NCS’ Notice & Mechanic’s Lien services,” says Kim Lamberty, CMA CEO.

“This is an incredibly exciting time for NCS and CMA,” states NCS President, Mary B. Cowan. “Together we will create more value for the CMA member. We’re grateful to have the opportunity to serve CMA members and pledge they will continue to receive superior service. NCS is laser focused on securing lien and bond claim rights while also providing educational support. We have built a solid relationship with CMA and this strategic partnership will allow us to strengthen our mission as the leading authority empowering clients in the management of their corporate credit decisions. NCS is dedicated to excellence and we look forward to providing exceptional, personalized service and first-in-class resources to the CMA member.”

CMA serves businesses primarily located in the western U.S., with offices in Las Vegas, NV and Glendale CA. NCS, serving industries throughout the U.S and internationally, is headquartered in Cleveland, OH.

About Credit Management Association

Credit Management Association® (CMA), is a non-profit association that has served business-to-business companies since 1883. CMA delivers a variety of services to large and small companies across the full spectrum of the business credit economy. In addition, CMA assists insolvent companies with workouts or liquidation through cost-effective alternatives to bankruptcy. For more information about CMA, call 800-541-2622, or visit www.creditmanagementassociation.org.

About NCS

Since 1970, NCS has been the leader in providing credit professionals throughout the U.S. and Canada with proactive solutions to secure receivables, minimize credit risk and improve profitability. With their distinct service groups: Construction, UCC, and Collection – NCS develops customized solutions based on your business model and organizational requirements to Secure Your Tomorrow®.

NCS has educated more than 600,000 credit professionals on securing their receivables and reducing their risk through NCS events, resources, and social media. NCS offers web based solutions such as LienFinder™, The National Lien Digest©, and LienTracker® Online. These resources help manage credit risk, provide time and information requirements, monitor deadlines and generate notices. NCS has been named a winner of The Northeast Ohio Top Workplaces Award for the past 4 years. For more information about NCS, call 800-826-5256, or visit www.ncscredit.com.

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Buy Once, Pay Twice? No! The Purpose of Lien Waivers

Homeowners sometimes get blindsided when it turns out the GC they hired hasn’t paid his subs or materials suppliers. The lien waiver in your contract protects homeowners against this.

BY JIM CORY

If you live in Tampa and own a house, count your blessings that you never hired John Iacovino and Ike’s Roofing to replace your roof. If you had, you may have ended up like John Pfaff who paid Iacovino $8,800 to re-roof his home. The roof got replaced, only Iacovino, owner of Ike’s Roofing, never paid for the roofing materials he obtained on credit from Suncoast Roofing Supply. And because, after first sending a Notice to Owner, Suncoast Roofing Supply filed for a mechanic’s lien on the property, Pfaff is now obligated to pay for the $3,700 worth of materials the supplier furnished to do the job. According to the local sheriff’s office, Suncoast Roofing Supply is out about $150,000 and there are now 70 properties with liens on them, thanks to Iacovino, who has a history of drug and DUI arrests.

Secure the Receivable

What that lien could potentially mean for Pfaff is that Suncoast Roofing Supply can force the sale of his home at auction—foreclose on it—to satisfy the $3,700 it is owed.

More likely, however, is that when he goes to sell his property, or if he attempts to refinance it, the amount owed to Suncoast Roofing Supply will be paid from the proceeds of the transaction. A mechanics lien, in legalese, is designed to “secure the receivable.” Goods or services were rendered in good faith, and the lien, to ensure payment, becomes an encumbrance to the sale or transfer of the property.

The mechanics’ lien (standard usage is now ‘Mechanics Lien’) has been around since 1791 and was first conceived in modern form by Thomas Jefferson as a way to encourage construction on the nation’s capital. The concept owes its existence to the economics of the construction business. Mechanics liens were created as a unique legal remedy to protect contractors and those who supply them with labor (subcontractors), materials (supply yards), or specialized services, such as design (architects, etc.), from being stiffed. Wikipedia.com defines the mechanics lien as “a security interest in the title to property for the benefit of those who have supplied labor or materials that improve the property.”

On one level, a mechanics lien entitles a contractor to come after a homeowner who refuses to pay. But it also entitles subcontractors or suppliers to come after that homeowner, and specifically the property, should the general contractor fail to pay either party as agreed. Under the law—every state has one and every state’s will differ—the improved property becomes collateral for payment. “A mechanic’s lien has nothing to do with mechanics in the usual sense,” notes legal website Nolo.com. “It’s a legal claim against property being improved, and it can be filed by anyone who provides materials or does work on the project and doesn’t get paid. The property itself becomes responsible for the debt, and the people who are owed money can force its sale at auction if something isn’t worked out.” That is, the lien holder (say Suncoast Roofing Supply, in the example above) could sue for foreclosure to satisfy the debt. Even if sale of the house at auction is not in the picture, “you cannot sell or refinance your home without dealing with the mechanics lien,” notes Colorado law firm Robinson & Henry, P.C.

“Thus when a creditor is owed a few thousand dollars he may record a Mechanics’ Lien against real property which may have a value of hundreds of thousands of dollars. You can see the leverage he has in collecting this debt! This is a great tool for mechanics, tradesmen, subcontractors, labor providers, and material providers. But it must be used properly or the Mechanics’ Lien may be found invalid and thus unenforceable.”

Not That Complicated

If you’re a contractor who’s been stiffed, or a supplier left holding the bag, the idea of taking legal action around the concept of a mechanics lien might sound complicated and expensive. Actually, it isn’t at all hard to file a mechanics lien. In Pennsylvania, for instance, you could simply go to anscers.com, fill out the online forms, submit them, and allow the lien service to file for you. The cost: $290, though the price goes to $850 for a New Jersey residential lien. Generally, counties charge a filing fee of less than $50, but the cost of preparing a lien, which would require a lien service or a lawyer, would be anywhere from $250 to $500.

The key is to move quickly and not let the situation drag on. You snooze, you lose. In New York, for instance, “you must file your mechanic’s lien within four months of the time that you last provided labor or materials to the project,” according to the website for New York Mechanic’s Lien. The time frame will differ in every state. So, similarly, is the requirement that preliminary notice—Notice of Intent to File a Lien—must be given, or, in some states, you as a subcontractor or supplier forfeit your right to file a lien. (Click here for a state-by-state breakdown of requirements for preliminary notice.) So, for example, in Florida, to collect for the materials it supplied to John Iacovino and Ike’s Roofing, Suncoast Roofing Supply would have to have served John Pfaff with a Notice to Owner (NTO)—preferably by registered, Global Express Guaranteed, or certified mail— “within 45 days from first furnishing services or materials.” That’s not a huge amount of time. Note that, according to the site: “Failure to
provide the notice within the statutorily mandated time frame is fatal to the lien claim in Florida.” The lien itself would need to be filed with 90 days of the date the materials were supplied and must be notarized to be valid.

In the state of California, mechanic’s liens are a constitutional right guaranteed to contractors by the California Constitution. This right has been implemented in detail by statutes enacted by the California State Legislature.

Lien Waivers

What Pfaff could have done to save himself the aggravation and expense of the mechanics lien filed by Suncoast Roofing Supply was to demand a waiver of liens, or a subcontractor lien waiver, in the contract he signed with Ike’s Roofing, if in fact he signed one. “With a lien waiver, when the project is successfully completed, both parties sign off and state that the contract obligations have been met, including the general contractor [in this case, Iacovino] making all necessary payments to materials suppliers, subcontractors or vendors,” advises the Angie’s List review site. “If the general contractor doesn’t agree to sign off on the subcontractor lien waiver, you can withhold payment until he or she has proved they’ve paid their suppliers or subcontractors.”

As for Pfaff, he can take some small amount of comfort in knowing that mechanics lien claims … very rarely result in a piece of property getting put up for auction and sold. As in, almost never. According to the source, and based on a survey of mechanics lien filings from 2011, 64 percent of lien claims were paid within three months, “without any additional legal or collection efforts whatsoever.” Which means that the mechanics lien functioned as Jefferson intended. So Pfaff will almost certainly keep his house. But unfortunately for him, he paid 50 percent more for that home’s roof than he ever thought he would have to.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Philadelphia-based freelance writer Jim Cory is a senior contributing editor to Professional Remodeler who specializes in covering the remodeling and home improvement industry. Reach him at coryjim@earthlink.net.

 

This article originally appeared on Professional Remodeler’s website. To read the original story, click here.

 

What’s a Defective (or Improper) Mechanic’s Lien, and How Does it Impact the Construction Project, by Sergey Garanyants

In certain instances, a mechanic’s lien filed by a contractor, subcontractor or material supplier can become either “improper” or “invalid” under relevant lien statutes, or “defective” on its face. In such cases, the owner is entitled to remove and/or discharge the mechanic’s lien so that the property is no longer burdened by it.

Many states provide for a different process to properly record a lien against a residential property, as compared to a commercial property. Nevertheless, the process of discharging an improper or invalid lien is largely the same.

Some of the most common situations that give rise to a defective lien occur when: 1) the lien claim is without basis, 2) the amount of lien claim is excessive or misstated, 3) filing of the lien claim was not performed in accordance with the relevant lien law statute, or 4) filing of the lien claim was not performed in time prescribed by the relevant lien law statute. In such situations, lien claimants generally forfeit their lien rights, and, in some instances may forfeit additional or subsequent remedies.

Moreover, many states mechanic’s/construction lien statutes punish contractors, subcontractors and suppliers who willfully fail to remove or release such improper lien claims, especially, if the notice of invalid lien was given by a party challenging its validity.

If it has been determined that your lien claim is invalid or improper, you must first provide the appropriate notice to the property owner challenging the validity of your lien and, in some situations, to the general contractor. Once such notice is given, lien claimants generally are allowed some period of time to discharge or release their lien claims by making appropriate filing with the state’s real estate records. The period of time to release an improper lien varies depending on the state. If the improper lien was not released, a property owner may file a complaint with the court in the state where the lien was recorded. Many state statutes will allow property owners, who were forced to pursue court action to remove or release an improper lien, to recover court costs and legal fees incurred in pursuing such action.

Source: “Removing Invalid Construction Lien”, the National Lien law Review, September 15, 2016, http://www.natlawreview.com/article/removing-invalid-construction-lien, Copyright © 2016, Stark & Stark.

Sergey Garanyants runs CMA’s Construction Forms Filing Services, helping CMA members in the construction industry protect their lien rights in all 50 U.S. states. For information about CMA’s construction forms filing services, visit http://creditmanagementassociation.org/services/construction-forms-filing/