The Advantages (and Disadvantages) of Accepting Credit Card Payments, by Scott Blakeley, Esq.

Customers in the B2B space are increasingly using credit cards to pay supplier invoices. The upside for the cardholder and paying customer is the 30 extra days to pay the cardholder statement that includes the supplier’s invoice. Cards also reduce paperwork and allow the customer to eliminate the time and cost of processing A/P checks. The upside for suppliers is that payment by credit card means near immediate remittance, reduced credit approval and collection activities, reduced credit and bankruptcy risk, and new sales channels (attracting customers who otherwise may not qualify for terms). Further, by accepting cards only when the order is placed, the supplier also enjoys increased cash flow, improved DSO and reduced A/R.

Still, there are complications involved with accepting credit cards in the B2B space. One area where suppliers may have particular legal questions surrounding their policy concerning credit cards is in collections, particularly in suppliers using credit cards as a collection strategy on past-due accounts.

As a speaker at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit in Las Vegas, I will address the use of credit cards as a supplier collection strategy in scenarios where the customer has failed to pay. I will cover the rules of the supplier accepting credit card payments on past due invoices from a customer who cannot pay. The discussion will also include the possibility of a surcharge rollout, and the legal issues associated with surcharging the credit card using customer, including how handle the 2-4% interchange fee that credit card companies charge their customers.

Join me as we cover this topic in much more detail at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit, September 17-18 at the Tropicana in Las Vegas. For more information about the conference, visit www.creditscapeconference.com. I hope to see you there.
Scott Blakeley, Esq., is founder of Blakeley LLP, where he advises companies around the United States and Canada regarding creditors’ rights, commercial law, e-commerce and bankruptcy law. He will be speaking at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit, and can be reached at seb@blakeleyllp.com.

Collections in the Digital Age: Technology, Outsourcing, and Compliance, by Eddy Sumar

‘Collections,’ ‘collectors,’ ‘collection agencies,’ ‘collection attorneys’: words that evoke strong emotions, sometimes even terror, in the hearts of uninformed debtors. Robocalls, automatic dialers, dialing for money, calling centers, SMS, texting, e-mailing, invoicing, phone calls, and personal visits—some of the avenues that companies pursue to collect their precious asset known as accounts receivable. When we look at the landscape of debt collection, we can see three things that beckon our attention: technology, outsourcing, and compliance.

These three areas have a great impact on people on all sides, creditors, intermediaries or third parties, and debtors. Let us look at each of these three areas separately.

Technology: Technology is a blessing, but it has side effects. When technology is employed, people lose their jobs. Technology leads to higher productivity at the beginning of the process, but it has long-term negative consequences. Digital technology, machines and robocalls do not satisfy the desires for human interaction. The fact is that technology should enhance the human factor, not diminish it. Technology should help us humans to produce more so we can have more time to interact and build the goodwill and loyalty. So the short-term need is to curb the negative effects of the technological factor in collection.

Outsourcing: Another factor that complicates collection is the outsourcing of debt collection to companies that do not understand the power of customer service and preserving customer and debtor goodwill. The calling-center mentality in collections is unempowered. It follows a certain script and cannot deviate from it. This railroad track mentality usually leads to derailment. The short-term benefits to the bottom-line will ultimately lead to long-term consequences that both eat the top-line and erode the bottom-line.

Compliance: As highlighted in the recent reports from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), consumers are being hounded by unethical collectors and unscrupulous collection agencies. These dial for money at all cost, intimidating the debtors with lawsuits and other methods that convey the thought of threatening their livelihood and dignity. To them, it is the money that counts, not the individual. To them, the debtor is totally at fault and they approach the debtor in a manner not fit for human dignity. The result is that the reputation of collectors and the agencies they work for are negatively affected. They become something to fear and avoid. The good news is: the collection industry is still filled with good law-abiding collectors. But unfortunately, it’s the bad apple that corrupts the whole bunch; the little poison that makes the refreshing glass of water on a sweltering day undrinkable. With technology the offense could easily be amplified. Bad collectors tend to hide behind their technological gadgets and screens, thinking that they can never be found in cyberspace. This new digital landscape allows bad collectors to abuse debtors, hurling at them every insult, thinking that the path of offense leads to collection success.

All of the above issues highlight the significance of compliance, which is compliance with existing codes and regulations, but above all compliance with the codes of human decency.

So, how can a company thrive in an environment of constant technological change? How can a company outsource its collection function without affecting the long-term profitability? How can a company be compliant?

The answers lie in a simple acronym: COLLECTOR.

The word ‘COLLECTOR’ embodies certain key qualities that need to be present whether a company pursues internal or external collection. If these qualities are pursued, then compliance issues will disappear. And if a company outsources to a third party to pursue its collection function, then the third party should have strong ethical standards that highlight the human factor. Here is the acronym:

C: Compassion, Connection, Communication, Courtesy, Customer-centric, Common sense

O: Options, Overcoming obstacles, Open-minded

L: Listen! Listen! Listen!

L: Learn! Legally-minded

E: Empathy, Education, Experience, Expertise, Excellence

C: Collaboration, Cooperation, Compliance

T: Teamwork, Targets, Timelines

O: Organization

R: Respect, Resolution, Results, Regulation

The above acronym highlights the human dimension of collection, not the technological and digital. It starts with the ‘C’ of compassion. Yes, collectors should show compassion to the debtor, especially in consumer transactions. Collectors need to connect in order to collect. Making that connection by building rapport is vital. Two-way open communication hallmarked by courtesy is paramount. Furthermore, a customer-centric approach is crucial in every collection call. I believe that collectors should always put on the customer service hat when they engage in collecting a debt. Simply put, it is common sense that should rule in collection.

Next, we see the ‘O,’ that opens the doors to options and alternatives. Collection is not a black and white approach. It should not be either / or. Collectors should work with the debtors to find the options and overcome the obstacles. Collectors should be open-minded throughout the collection process.

The first ‘L’ underlines the significance of listening. The key function for a collector should be to listen—listen to the debtor, listen to the debtor, listen to the debtor, listen to common sense. It is through listening that collectors move to the second ‘L.’

The second ‘L’ is a natural by-product of listening. When collectors listen, they learn, they go beneath the surface to see the unseen and the hidden. When they listen, they find the options that are practical and relevant. And yes, collectors should be legally-minded. They need to know the law, abide by the law and respect the law. Listening leads to the next letter ‘E.’

The ‘E’ reminds us of empathy. And empathy will make the collector’s job more exciting. Empathy humanizes the process; it allows the collector to walk in the debtor’s shoes—to feel, see, and experience the world from the debtor’s perspective and through the debtor’s eyes. Empathy leads to education that equips the collector with the experience that builds the expertise needed to show excellence in handling the collection process.

The next letter ‘C’ puts the spotlight on collaboration and cooperation. I read a quote that says: “If you want to be incrementally better: Be competitive. If you want to be exponentially better: Be cooperative.” So, for collectors to be better, to feel better, and for debtors to be better and feel better, they all need to cooperate and collaborate. Collaboration that reflects all of the previous ingredients will lead to compliance. Ethical and moral collectors that embody humanity and exercise their function with integrity and dignity cannot help but be compliant.

Now, the ‘T’ introduces teamwork that adds the flavor of joint effort and togetherness. When teams come together, they have a goal, a target to achieve. And with targets comes timelines. Thus, the collection process has an objective to collect in a timely manner to ensure the timely cashflow of the creditor while helping the debtor to be released on a timely manner from the burden of debt.

For collectors to really be successful they need the ‘O’ of organization. Organization allows the collector to handle the workflow with ease and proficiency. Organization allows the collector to become efficient and effective.

The final letter ‘R’ reiterates the importance of the human factor. Respect is a human need and collectors should show it at every step in the collection process. In addition to respect, collectors should never forget that collection is about resolution, resolving the issues, dissolving impasses and finding the options that lead to results. All should be done with dignity and decency under the vigilant eye of the law and regulations.

Just imagine collectors who exemplify the above! Collections, collectors will become words that elicit admiration and appreciation.

The human approach in collections will yield greater results than the hard-nosed and hardliner approach. Good, ethical, and law-abiding collectors are guides. They guide their debtors through the collection process leading them to win-win solutions. They steer them in the direction of resolution keeping the goals in sight, while showing understanding and empathy, maintaining initiative, and demonstrating high integrity and strong discipline. They allow themselves to be educated by the process and by the debtor in order to reach the destination without victims and injury.

From the above, we can see that collection is a multi-disciplinary process combining among many things a human approach that reflects knowledge of psychology, anthropology, sociology, negotiation, time management, organizational techniques and a host of functional skills needed in the collection field. To collect is not just about the moment, it is about the future. Though the digital age is here collection will always be a human function.
Eddy A. Sumar is the President & Founder of ERS Consulting Services. He is also the director of education and community outreach for CMA, and will be speaking at the upcoming CreditScape Fall Summit. He can be reached at 909-481-9869 or ealberto@aol.com. 

Don’t Delay Dealing Decisively, by Michael C. Dennis

I was just re-reading my recent blog post about career limiting mistakes, and thought I’d add this insight that applies to anyone who is a manager.

Don’t delay difficult discussions with your subordinates relating to performance or behavior problems. Doing so tends to de-motivate and demoralize other members of your team who are usually watching carefully, and will be quick to note when such a problem is not managed effectively. Managers can lose the respect and confidence of other direct reports if they delay dealing decisively with problematic employees.

In this case, I’ve used alliteration to make a point: if one bad apple can ruin the whole bunch, don’t let that bad apple be you.

What trait do you believe makes the most ineffective manager? I welcome your feedback.

Michael is the author of the Encyclopedia of Credit (www.encyclopediaofcredit.com), a free, fast, internet resource for credit and collection professionals.  He is a consultant, and the author of “Credit and Collection Forms and Procedures Manual” as well as a frequent instructor at CMA-sponsored educational events.  He can be contacted at 949-584-9685.

Kudos to CMA’s Accounting Department

Recently, CMA’s office supplies vendor held a contest to recognize its clients’ accounting departments. Diana Escobar, CMA’s Operations Administrator in Burbank, submitted the winning essay describing why CMA’s accounting department deserved the prize. Here is a picture of CMA’s Accounting Department enjoying their reward – a free lunch provided by Ron Lasley and Cathy de Leon of Economy Office Supply (Cathy even brought home-made cupcakes!).

CMA's Accounting Staff - click to enlarge
Pictured from left to right: David Macomber, CPA (Vice President and CFO), Cindy Briceno (Accounts Receivable), Edgar Velasquez (Accounting Clerk), Michael Hansen (Systems Administrator), Clara Lucas (Accounts Payable), LaDeva Shaw (Adjustment Bureau Bookkeeper), Cheryl Lloyd (Senior Accountant), and Pratana Thammasatit (General Bookkeeper).

On behalf of the entire staff of CMA, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the folks in the Accounting Department for all they do to keep us running, and kudos to Diana Escobar for taking the initiative to write an essay recognizing their extraordinary efforts. Economy Office Supply published Diana’s winning story in their own online newsletter:

Winning Story for the Accounting Dept.:
Credit Management Association (CMA) is a non-profit association that has served business to-business companies since 1883. CMA helps credit, collection, and financial decision-makers get the information and support they need to make fast, accurate credit decisions.

CMA’s Accounting Department consist of 8 individuals including the CFO bookkeepers and IT personnel who handle everything and anything that has to do with money and programming. These 8 people have been the longest standing employees for CMA with more than 100 years combined and one person having more than 30 years of experience working for CMA. They handle all accounting for our other remote locations as well. Everything goes threw them and they are very strict individuals who work very hard for the company with very little recognition.
CMA is an association with a major focus on our members we hold a lot of functions, seminars and events for the members to network. Plenty of times departments are invited to join in on the events but unfortunately the accounting department hardly ever goes as there is always a reason to stay behind and run things smoothly.

I believe CMA’s accounting department deserves some type of recognition and know that we [everyone else at CMA] appreciates them for their hard work. I hope to hear from you that our Accounting Department has won as they deserve the lunch away from the office and especially deserve the recognition.

Respectfully,
Diana E.
CREDIT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

More pics from today’s lunch:

Accounting Department and Economy Office Supply
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CMA Poll Results – Business Credit Reports

CMA Member Poll: Your thoughts on business credit reports? (463 responses)

  • They are a valuable resource 18%
  • They are necessary but not always valuable 17%
  • They are not a valuable resource 1%
  • We carry a contract for reports 17%
  • We order reports as we need them 19%
  • We use more than one brand (D&B, Experian, Equifax etc.) of report 17%
  • We use only one brand of report 9%
Other comments:
“more valuable for private companies”
“Wish more companies would report more accts.”
“We find that D&B reports are totally outdated and wrong information. We belong to a local credit group which is very helpful.”
“We rely on our on trade data reports”
“We don’t use them hardly at all but probably should”

 

 

 

 

 

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