What’s a Defective (or Improper) Mechanic’s Lien, and How Does it Impact the Construction Project, by Sergey Garanyants

In certain instances, a mechanic’s lien filed by a contractor, subcontractor or material supplier can become either “improper” or “invalid” under relevant lien statutes, or “defective” on its face. In such cases, the owner is entitled to remove and/or discharge the mechanic’s lien so that the property is no longer burdened by it.

Many states provide for a different process to properly record a lien against a residential property, as compared to a commercial property. Nevertheless, the process of discharging an improper or invalid lien is largely the same.

Some of the most common situations that give rise to a defective lien occur when: 1) the lien claim is without basis, 2) the amount of lien claim is excessive or misstated, 3) filing of the lien claim was not performed in accordance with the relevant lien law statute, or 4) filing of the lien claim was not performed in time prescribed by the relevant lien law statute. In such situations, lien claimants generally forfeit their lien rights, and, in some instances may forfeit additional or subsequent remedies.

Moreover, many states mechanic’s/construction lien statutes punish contractors, subcontractors and suppliers who willfully fail to remove or release such improper lien claims, especially, if the notice of invalid lien was given by a party challenging its validity.

If it has been determined that your lien claim is invalid or improper, you must first provide the appropriate notice to the property owner challenging the validity of your lien and, in some situations, to the general contractor. Once such notice is given, lien claimants generally are allowed some period of time to discharge or release their lien claims by making appropriate filing with the state’s real estate records. The period of time to release an improper lien varies depending on the state. If the improper lien was not released, a property owner may file a complaint with the court in the state where the lien was recorded. Many state statutes will allow property owners, who were forced to pursue court action to remove or release an improper lien, to recover court costs and legal fees incurred in pursuing such action.

Source: “Removing Invalid Construction Lien”, the National Lien law Review, September 15, 2016, http://www.natlawreview.com/article/removing-invalid-construction-lien, Copyright © 2016, Stark & Stark.

Sergey Garanyants runs CMA’s Construction Forms Filing Services, helping CMA members in the construction industry protect their lien rights in all 50 U.S. states. For information about CMA’s construction forms filing services, visit http://creditmanagementassociation.org/services/construction-forms-filing/

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